Newsletter July 2017

Case Highlight : Meibomian Adenomas, Summer Eye Safety: Foxtails, Happy Anniversary to Mari and Welcome Victoria & Kira !

 Click Above for pdf file

Click Above for pdf file

Meibomian Adenomas: Glandular Eyelid Tumors

Many patients are referred to our practice for eyelid growths. While we see a variety of eyelid abnormalities the most common is a glandular tumor called a meibomian adenoma. Fortunately, many of these adenoma eyelid tumors are benign (meaning they are not cancerous or likely to spread throughout the body).

However, these tumors can grow rapidly due to the accumulation of glandular material. As they grow, they become problematic since they can cause irritation to the surface of the eye which is not only uncomfortable for the patient, but also increases the likelihood of secondary infection. Larger tumors are also at a greater risk of hemorrhaging (bleeding).

Historically, eyelid tumors have been removed by traditional surgical methods - wedge resection using a scalpel and sutures. The main disadvantage of this technique is the necessity for general anesthesia. Modern technique utilizes a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser combined with cryotherapy (freezing). The procedure is elegant and dependable with varying sizes and locations of eyelid tumors. First, the patient is sedated and given a local anesthetic to desensitize the eyelid. The laser is used to remove the bulk of the tumor. Cryotherapy is then used to ablate any remaining tumor cells, significantly decreasing the possibility of recurrence of the growth in the same area. The success rate for treating and removing these benign tumors is typically 98%. The treatment allows patients to go home the same day and typically without the need to wear a protective Elizabethan collar (e.g. the cone of shame)! 

Summer Eye Safety: Foxtails !

 As we head into the peak of summer, pet owners should be on the lookout for foxtails! Foxtails are barbed-shaped seeds from the foxtail plant whose shape allows them to burrow into sensitive areas on our pets, especially the eyes, ears, nose, paws, and mouth. These seeds do not break down inside the body, so anembedded foxtail can lead to serious infection. If stuck within the eye, it could even lead to perforation of the eye.

Some tips for avoiding foxtails are to recognize what the plant looks like and make sure your pets are not walking on or through it. Similarly, check your home for foxtail grass and immediately remove them in order both help keep your pet form being poked by one!

 Happy Anniversary, Mariela!

Happy 1-year Anniversary to Mariela, our lead RVT! We thank you for your diligent hard-work and amazing care of our patients! We are incredibly grateful to have you has part of our team!

 Mariela Patterson,  RVT

Mariela Patterson,  RVT

 Welcome to the Team, Victoria and Kira!

Victoria comes with almost 2 years of experience as a veterinary customer service representative and veterinary assistant. In addition to working at VCFA, Victoria attends Foothill College to gain her Veterinary Assisting Certification. 

Kira is a recent graduate from UC Davis with a degree in AnimalBiology. She has a broad range of experience form working in research labs to interning at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

We are excited and fortunate to have them both join our team at Vision Care for Animals!

 Victoria Byers

Victoria Byers

 Kira Lin , BS

Kira Lin , BS